Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 5

CHAPTER 5

5         ASSESSMENT OF RESOURCES FOR SHELTER

  • Land

Lands that are deemed suitable and available for housing have been inventoried.  Irrigable and irrigated rice lands and other lands not allowable and not compatible for residential uses are excluded from the inventory.

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Listed in Table below are the lands identified as suitable and available based on their actual status, ownership, and the strong possibility of the owners’ interest to venture into the housing industry. It shows that there has a sufficient availability of land for the program and that is 52 hectares against the future need of 38.09 hectares. Mention the Real Names. The table shows  that these lots were located along national highway and along secondary roads within Poblacion to match the needs of the displaced Households that were affected with road widening. The land owned by ____(1) and ___(2)   allotted for socialized housing and the rest are for economic housing which has a total of 28 hectares. While socialized housing needs only 14.96 hectares. While land owned by 3, 4, and 5 having a total of 24 hectares allotted for economic housing which only need of 23.13 hectares. Therefore, concluded that there has  sufficient availability of land for both socialized and economic housing.

 

Table – 32  Inventory of Available Suitable Lands for Housing.

Source: As surveyed by MPDC and MAO

The Chart below shows that the socialized housing land needs is 14.96 hectares and the land available is 28 hectares while the economic housing land needs is 23.14 hectares and the land available is 24 hectares which only shows that there has a sufficient land for the whole planning period with regards to socialized and economic housing land availability.

Figure ______ – Comparison of Land Need and Availability of Land

 

 

Table below shows the comparison between the land available and land needed for housing.  Based on the affordable housing options being proposed by the planners, the land need is 38.09 hectares while the available land is 52 hectares. So therefore, there has sufficient land for the whole planning period.

Table  33 –  Comparison of Land Availability and Land Requirement

Source: As Computed 

Table below shows that for those households belonging to the first income group (below poverty threshold), 14.96 hectares needed to address their shelter needs. This income group is belong for  socialized housing (house and lot options not exceeding P450,000.00). The second income group needs 9.15 hectares, the 3rd group needs 10.73 hectares, the 4th needs 2.04 hectares, the 5th needs .88 hectares while the sixth needs .34 hectares.  The total of these five income groups is 23.14 hectares, which sums up the total land needed for economic housing.  Also shown in the same table is the comparison between the land availability and land needed for housing. Based on the affordable housing options being proposed, the land need totals to 38.09 hectares and the land available has a total of 52 hectares. Therefore, the land availability for both the socialized and economic housing is sufficient.

Table 34 –  Comparison of Land Need and Available Suitable Land for Housing

Source: As computed

5.2 – Infrastructure & Basic Services (for new units and upgrading of infra facilities)

Power Needs.  Table below presents the need for power versus the capacity of ZAMSURECO, the power provider.  The figures show that the annual capacity of ZAMSURECO  has 600 units can be served annually while the need between 2016 to 2025 is over 6,000 connections.  Thus there has a sufficient or enough services in terms of power supply all throughout the program period which only requires of 3,736 units.

Table 35 – Assessment of Power Need vs Capacity of Service Provider

Sanitation Need. Table below presents the need for sanitation versus the capacity of LGU  as the sanitation provider specifically on toilet bowls.  The figures show that the annual capacity of LGU  has 1,900 units can be served while the need between 2016 to 2018 is over 5,700 units.  Thus there has a sufficient or enough services in terms of supply on toilet bowls all throughout the program period which only requires of 5,421 units.

Table 36 – Assessment of Sanitation Need vs Capacity of Service Provider

Water Need. The Table below presents the need for water versus the capacity of  LGU  as the water provider.  The figures show that the annual capacity of  LGU  has 6,000 units and even more can be served while the need between 2016 to 2025 is over 3,736 units.  Thus there has a sufficient or enough services in terms of supply on water all throughout the program period which only requires of 5,421 units. Titay has sufficient supply of water considering that the main source of Ipil-Titay Water District is came from Titay.

Table 37 – Assessment of Water Need vs Capacity of Service Provider

The chart below shows the summary of assessments of need vs capacity of service providers. It shows also that among the assessments of need, the power and water needs are almost to be doubled in relation to capacity of service providers in which 3,751 HHs are in need for power while 3,736 HHs are in need of water and the capacity of service providers are 7,000 and 6,000 HHs respectively.

Figure _____ – Summary of Assessment of Needs VS Capacity of Service Providers

Drainage System Need. So far Titay has adept with regards to drainage system in the municipality considering that LGU has lots of equipments for this purpose such as bulldozer, back hoe, grader and etc. Thus at the end of 2014 the Local Government of Titay has cleared all the possible sites that caused of excess water and flooding.

Table 38 – Assessment of Drainage Need vs Capacity of Service Provider

 Road access. As mentioned earlier that Titay has almost all the equipments needed for accessing roads from  Poblacion to barangays and aside from that the administration is particular on farm to market roads some years back already that makes now all barangays accessible.

Table 39 – Assessment of Roads Need vs Capacity of Service Provider

 Garbage Collection and Disposal Need.  As mentioned in previous chapter that Titay is adequate on sanitation in connection to Garbage Collection and Disposal Need. The program that the LGU is on thrust “Make Environment Clean” has able to come up a technique to have a round of garbage collection and disposal of 7 days in a week. The presence of “Eco-park” of the municipality “make the environment clean”  coupled with the implementation on “Smoke Free Program” that keep even cigarettes butts in placed and made the only municipality of the province of Zamboanga Sibugay having a “red orchids” recognition.  “Red Orchids” means that the degree of implementation is quite exceptional with regards to a “smoke free” municipality.

Table  40  – Assessment of Garbage Collection & Disposal Need vs Capacity of Service Provider

 No Structures to be Upgraded. The planners has come up to an assessment that there has no identified structures yet to be upgraded considering that Titay is still a 2nd class municipality and aside from that it is an agricultural municipality that most of the job seekers such as rice harvesters, rice planters, rubber tappers and others  came from other places during harvesting and planting season and stay in the farm together with their friends/relatives houses. After the said seasons, job seekers go home to their respective places which make the absence of structure in the municipality for them to shelter permanently.

Table 41 –  Assessment of Structures Need to Upgrade vs Capacity of Service Provider

The chart below shows the summary of assessments of need vs capacity of service providers. It shows also that among the assessments of need, the power and water needs are almost to be doubled in relation to capacity of service providers in which 3,751 HHs are in need for power while 3,736 HHs are in need of water and the capacity of service providers are 7,000 and 6,000 HHs respectively.  No upgrading needs on Structures, Drainage, Garbage Collection and Road Access.

Legend:

5.3 Finance

Housing Finance requirements (for new units).  This portion deals with the financial requirements in putting up the identified housing options as well as the potential fund sources.

Table below shows that the estimated project cost for all the proposed housing assistance for the period 2016-2025 amounted to P1,551,953.28.

It shows also in this table the financial requirements of each income group, the cost per unit and the number of housing units needed. Thus, the 1st income group needs a 1,636 units at 340,678.40 per unit for 1st housing designed, and belong to socialized housing which make a total amount of 557,349,862.40.  While the 2nd, 3rd and 4th income group has assigned to a 2nd housing designed with a total of 1,894 units needed at 481,833.60 per unit which makes up a total 912,592,838.40. While the 5th and 6th income group are assigned to 3rd housing design and needs a housing units of 105 units at 777,792.00 per unit which makes up a total of 82,010,388.48 with an overall financial requirements of P1,551,953,089.28 for the whole program period from 2016 to 2025.

Table 42 – Estimated Financial Requirements for Housing Provision By Housing Design 2016- 2025

The table below shows that the possible potential sources of funds are NHA, Social Housing and Finance, HDMF, Gawad Kalinga and Habitat for Humanity and some other Housing providers can be tapped to finance the  land development and house construction.  There are likewise other fund sources that can be later identified and tapped by the municipality.

The possible planners’ strategy is by tapping the financing of several housing providers to met the whole possible funds for shelter provision for the whole program period. In where, the NHA is tap to undergo the resettlement assistance by purchasing lots  which cost of P102,898,023, Social housing and Finance Corp are for land development with an amount of P232,100,624. While HDMF, Ground Kalinga and Habitat for Humanity are for Developmental Loan and mainly for house construction and that costs P405,675,324 for each of them, summing up the three has costs of P1,217,025,972 and makes the total costs of Potential Sources of Funds For Shelter Provision of P1,551,953,089.28.

Table 43 –  Potential Sources of Funds for Shelter Provision 2016-2025

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

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Local Shelter PLan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

CHAPTER 6

WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN

The implementation plan is presented in a tabular form, together with the goals, strategies, activities, responsible agencies, resources needed (what and how much) and the timetable for each activity.

Table  below spells out the details of the Local Shelter Plan in terms of work program and financial plan. The table shows the programs/projects/activities per strategy identified which are all geared towards the realization of the various objectives.  The table also shows the responsible agencies, the resources  needed to implement the plan, the fund sources and the schedule of implementation of each activity.  All in all, the total plan need One Billion Five Hundred Fifty One Million Nine Hundred Fifty Three Thousand Eiighty Nine and 29/100  P1,551,953,089.28.

Table 44 –  WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, 2016-2025

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

 

 

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

                   CHAPTER 3

3.        ASSESSMENT OF SHELTER NEED

3.1 Assumptions and Definitions

This portion covers the discussions on the assumptions and definitions used in the plan, the current housing situation, the need for new units due to backlog and population growth, and the upgrading needs.

Oftentimes, data are outdated, not available or unreliable.  These are the usual reasons why the planner has to make assumptions.  There are also some terms that need to be defined in order for the readers to understand these words in the context of local shelter planning.

Definition of Terms. The housing parlance is quite complicated; thus, in order to have a common understanding of the terms used in this plan, relevant terms are hereby defined:

Affordability – the potential amount of income that could be made available for housing investment after excluding basic necessities such as food, clothing, education, medical expenses, transportation, income tax and recurrent costs of housing (electricity, water, garbage disposal).

Backlog –  is the number of dwelling units needed at the beginning of the planning period due to doubled-up HHs, displaced units and homeless HHs/individuals

Displaced units (relocation need) – Units located a) in danger areas such as esteros, railroad tracks, garbage dumps, river banks and flood prone areas or households/individuals living in public places such as sidewalks, roads, parks, play grounds, b) in areas where government infrastructure projects are to be implemented, and c) in areas where there is a court order for eviction and demolition.

 

Base Year – is the year before the first planning period or the last census year.

Doubled-up households – also known as double occupancy, exists when one dwelling unit is shared by two or more households

Future Need – refers to the number of new dwelling units needed to supply the demand of new household formed due to population increase.

Homeless – are the individuals or households living in parks, along sidewalks, and all those without any form of shelter.

Household – as defined by NSO is a social unit consisting of a person or a group of person who sleep in the same dwelling unit and have common arrangement for the preparation and consumption of food.

Housing Stock – is the number of occupied dwelling units at the beginning of the 1st planning period.  It can be computed as the number of households during the beginning of the first planning period minus the number of homeless households and/or individuals, and divide the difference by the number of households per dwelling unit.

Planning Period – period covers the duration that will be needed to realize the housing vision of the LGU.

Program Period – Program period is the time frame set by the LGU to meet the target housing needs due to backlog, population growth and upgrading needs.

Shelter needs – 1.) the new housing units needed (lot, basic services and dwelling unit) and 2.) the upgrading needs (either land tenure, some of basic services, or structural improvement of unit or combinations of these).

Upgrading Need – is defined as the need for improving land tenure status, e.g., provision of minimum security of tenure as in a written contract on possessing a title to the land; access to basic services, e.g., macadam road to paved road; and house condition, e.g., from a semi-permanent structure to a permanent one.

Basic Data, Definitions and Assumptions:

  1. Planning Period is from 2016 – 2025 (10 years) This should be in tune with the coverage of the CLUP
  1. The population growth rate is 2.189 % based on NEDA population data and will remain constant throughout the planning period.
  1. Housing Stock is computed to be 10,056. This is derived from the number of households (10,084) minus homeless households (0) and divided by the ratio of households per dwelling unit (1.0027). Ratio of HH/DU is based on 2010 NSO data.
  1. Household size of 4.92 based on NSO 2007 data, will remain the same throughout the 10-year planning period.
  1. There is no homeless households in the Municipality .
  1. Number of households needing relocation (displaced units) totals to 1,064. They are found in the following areas:
PALOMOC 299
POBLACION 208
NAMNAMA 191
POBLACION MUSLIM 37
KITABOG 280
MOALBOAL 49
  1. Adequate land tenure refers to lands that are being owned, amortized, and covered by lease or usufruct agreements.
  1. Number of Households needing tenurial upgrading totals to 87 . They are composed of both on-site and qualified recipients of LGU housing assistance by allowing them to own the said lot and facilitating them to secure their own land title.
BLISS OCCUPANTS 30
TOMAS CLAUDIO STREET 28
KAMBINGAN 29
  1. Adequate power supply is defined as having the presence of primary and secondary lines of a legitimate power provider in the area.
  1. Adequate potable water supply is water from the local water district (Titay-Ipil Water District).
  1. Unadequate sanitary facility refers to water-sealed toilet with depository that a household was not using.
  1. Regular garbage collection by the garbage trucks (7-times a week) and the Material Recovery Facility (MRF) in the rural barangays, and composting in the upland and interior barangays, are considered as adequate garbage disposal system.
  1. Adequate drainage system well-maintained by the Local Government Unit.
  1. Adequate road access.
  1. There is no dilapidated or condemned housing which do not have proper roofing, walling and flooring materials structures subject for upgrading.
  1. The target HH beneficiaries’ income groupings are based on the information gathered Municipal Planning Development Council (MPDC). Below are the assumed income groups and its composition:

1st Income group – families of farm workers/trisikad/ tricycle drivers odd jobs earning P6,690 and below monthly

2nd Income group – families of tricycle operators/casual workers, small businessmen/ vendors earning P6,691-P15,000 monthly.

3rdIncome group –families of permanently employed skilled laborers earning P15,001-P30,000 monthly

4thIncome group – OFW-supported families receiving P30,001-P45,000 monthly

5th Income group – families of professionals / supervisors earning P45,001-P60,000 monthly

6th Income groups – families of highly paid professionals and entrepreneurs whose monthly earnings exceed P60,000.

  1. Potential percentage of income for upgrading or new housing is estimated as follows:
  • 1st Income group – 8% (house rental 5%, alcoholic beverage 2%, tobacco 1%)
  • 2nd Income group – 8% (house rental 4.5%, alcoholic beverage 1%, gifts 0.5%, tobacco 1%, special occasion 1%)
  • 3rd Income group – 10% (house rental 5%, alcoholic beverage 1%, gifts 1%, tobacco 1%, special occasion 1%, other expenditures 1% )
  • 4th Income group – 10% (house rental 5%, alcoholic beverage 1%, gifts 0.5%, tobacco 0.5%, special occasion 1%, other expenditures 2%)
  • 5thIncome group – 16%(house rental 8%, alcoholic beverage 1%, gifts 1.5%, tobacco 1.5%, special occasion 2%, non-durable equipment 2%

 

  • 6th Income group – 12% (house rental 10%, house repair and maintenance 2%

3.2- Current Housing Situation.

The year 2010 (the base year in the Planning Period for the Local Shelter Plan) had shown dramatic growth in terms of catering the needs of informal settlers such as settlers found at lot owned by LGU, and along the national highway from Barangay Moalboal to Barangay Palomoc.

The gathered data magnifies the urgent need for all sectors to join hands and exert a unified effort to effect meaningful changes to secure levels of sustainable housing development program for future generation, a program, which also attunes itself to the town economic development and growth just as it works tirelessly towards the legislation of a child friendly and resilient sensitive housing policies.

3.2.1-  Backlog

The table below shows the compositions of the 1,092 units of backlog.  The backlog is therefore composes of displaced units with a total of 1,064 households, the doubled-up units or sharers, having a total of 28 households and  it is assumed that homeless HHs is to be zero because there are no manifestations of literally homeless people in the municipality. These data reveal that 97 % of the backlog comprises the displaced units, 3% only is for doubled-up and  it is assumed that homeless HHs is to be zero (0%).  The table further reveals that on the 2nd program period (2018-2019), 14 new units have to be produced annually to serve the doubled-up households, while 122 and 233 units have to be provided annually from 2016 to 2018 and 2019-2021 respectively to address the needs of the displaced households.

Table 15 – NEW HOUSING UNITS NEEDED Due to Backlog

            Note: As computed                         

The chart below is vividly showing  the new units needed due to backlog in percent (%) and that has been participated by displaced HHs came from different barangays which comprises of 97%, while the doubled up has got its portion of 3% and zero (0%) for the homeless.

Figure 9 – New housing units needed due to backlog  participated by Displaced Units by Barangays, the Doubled-up and the Homeless by Percent (%).

The chart below shows that out of 97% of Backlog, there are six barangays affected and the Barangay Palomoc has the highest new housing units needed having 27% (299 units), followed by Barangay Kitabog of 26% (280 units) and next to Kitabog is barangay Poblacion having  19% (191 units), the barangay Namnama is 17% (191) units, the Barangay Moalboal is 4% (49) units, the Barangay Poblacion Muslim has 3% (37 units) as the least of all the barangays having displaced units affected with road widening and found along the national highway, while the doubled up is just like the barangay Poblacion Muslim who has its share of 3%, and the homeless is zero (0%).

Barangay Palomoc and Namnama show that they are the 1st and 4th dense among the Barangays having displaced HHs and at the same time they are somewhere at the periphery of one of the fault lines traversing the municipality in relation to road widening and situate along the most impact portion of fault line.  (See Map – 7). 

Figure  10 – Distribution of the New Housing Needs Due to Backlog  by the Different  Barangays, the Doubled-up and the Homeless in Percent (%). 

3.2.2 – Future Need

 3.2.2.1  Population Projection and Household Projection In Relation to Future Needs

Table below shows that the Population and Household Projection were based to the annual increased of 2.189% as per  population growth rate of the municipality of Titay from NEDA  population data and will remain constant throughout the planning period from year 2016-2025. These projections will be used for  Planning and Program Period in response to the number of new dwelling units needed to supply the demand of new household formed due to population increased.

Year 2015 is the based year of the Planning Period which has a projected 10,522 households using the 4.92 household size and this will be used until year 2025.  The year 2016 is 10,752 HHs and that would be keep increasing up to 13,066 HHs on the year 2025 which is the last year of the program period.

Table  16 – Population  and Household Projection and Yearly Increased of HHs 2016-2025

The Table below shows  the projected population of 2016, 2021 and 2025 (Please refer to Table 15) using the year 2015 as the base year. This projected population will be used to determine the number of projected household for the above mentioned Planning Periods using the average 4.92 HH size.

Table – 17  Population Projections

3.2.2.1 – Future Need and the Projected Population Growth

Table below shows the Total number of household every Planning Period of 2016-2018, 2019-2021 and 2022-2025.  The average annual population growth rate of the municipality is computed to be 2.189 per cent.  Using this growth rate, the population was projected for the planning period 2016-2025 and the corresponding increase in the number of households or what is likewise referred to as future need, was computed to be 2,544 units. This translates to an estimated of 235 households annually for the first planning period (2016-2018), 251 households annually for the second planning period (2017-2019), and 271 households in the third planning period (2022-2025).

Table – 18 New units needed due to FUTURE NEED (Population Growth)

Source: As Computed

Summary of new units needed.

Table below shows that the total new units needed due to backlog and future growth or population increase for the period 2016-2025, is 3,636 units.  The table likewise presents that the bulk of the need to be addressed by the plan which is 40% (1,466) units falls within the 2nd  planning period; and the rest of the planning period are 29.87% (1,086) units and 29.82% (1,084) units on the 1st and 2nd Planning Period respectively.

Housing units should be made available for these 3,636 displaced units need to be relocated to a suitable site which give them secure tenure and decent shelter, as well as the sharers should be provided with their own dwelling units because ideally, one house should be occupied by only one household.

Table 19 – Summary of new units needed (due to backlog and population growth)

Source: As Computed

The planners decided to prioritize the displaced households over the doubled-up in terms of provision of shelter because their situation demands urgency due to road widening. This is the reason why addressing their need for shelter immediately starts in 2016. The doubled-up households will be attended on 2018-2019 since it is assumed that, while they are still sharing a home with another household, their lives and properties are in no immediate danger.

The table below shows that 2nd year of planning (2019-2021) has the bulk to be addressed and that is came from doubled up or sharers of 14 units, has displaced units of Poblacion, Namnama, Palomoc with 208, 191, 299 units respectively and increased of population growth on the year 2019, 2020 and 2021 having 246, 251 and 257 units respectively  that makes a  total of 1,466 units thus; for the whole program period, the planners assumed that 3,636 displaced units will be addressed gradually before the end of 2025.

Table 20 – Total New Units Needed  Due To Backlog and Population Growth

3.2.3– Upgrading Needs  

Cover three main categories of needs: tenure upgrading need, infrastructure upgrading needs and structural upgrading needs.

3.2.3.1 Tenure Upgrading.

The table below shows that there are 87 tenurial settlers and it is .87% of 10,056 housing stock. These future needs will be addressed within 3 years of 30, 29 and 28 units of the year 2016, 2017 and 2018 respectively. The Planners has come to a decision and able to come up a plan to upgrade the status of these households between 2016 and 2025.  This is translated to assist an average of 29 households annually in accessing security of land tenure through the facilitation of the LGU on securing titles and some other paper shows ownership of the said parcels.

Table 21- Tenure Upgrading Needs 

3.2.3.2 – Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading (Units Without Electricity)

The table below shows the households need upgrading on electric current. There are 115 units were found for upgrading and it is 1.14% of the housing stock and these will be addressed within 3 years  of 38, 39 and 38 units for the year 2016, 2017 and 2018 respectively.

Table 22 – Infrastructure Need on Units Without Electricity

         
Infrastructure Need on Units Without Electricity
2.  Infrastructure Need % of housing stock Total Annual Program Period
q  Units w/o electricity
1.14% 115 38 2016
39 2017
38 2018
Housing Stock = 10,056      

3.2.3.3 – Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading (Units Without Water Supply)

The table below shows the households needs upgrading on Water Supply. There are 100 units were found for upgrading and it is .99% of the housing stock and these will be addressed within 3 years  and 33, 34 and 33 units for the year 2016, 2017 and 2018 respectively. The planners are confident that within 3 years this problem will be addressed considering that Titay is rich of water source and out of that sources, Titay has supplied potable water  for the municipality of Ipil.

Table 23-  Infrastructure Need on Units Without Water Supply

3.2.3.3 – Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading On Units without Sanitation

The Table below shows that there has 5.4%  or 5,421 HHs  need sanitation in relation to “toilet bowls”.  The annual target that the LGU can address is 1,807 HHs within a planning period of 3 years from 2016-2018.

Table 23 – Infrastructure Need on Units Without Sanitation

3.2.3.4 – Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading ( No upgrading on Road Access)

There has no units needed for upgrading. Titay governance is very particular on road infrastructure and because of this reason, the Local Government of Titay purchased heavy equipments needed to maintain and clear all the road access to all barangays such as bulldozers, graders, back hoes and others.

 

Table 25- All Units have Adequate Road Access

3.2.3.5– Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading ( No upgrading on Garbage Collection and Disposal )

There has no units needed for upgrading in relation to Garbage Collection. Titay governance has its own program called “Make Environment Clean (MEC) and because of this reason, the Local Government of Titay prohibits production and accumulation of garbage around and especially cigarettes butts in coordination with the ‘’No Smoking” anywhere within the premises of the municipality but observed smoking at specified area that were identified purposely where smoking allowed.  There has a regular pick–up of garbage all through the days of the week.

Table 26 – All Units have Adequate Garbage Collection

3.2.3.6  Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading ( No upgrading on Drainage System )

There has no unit yet  identified for upgrading in connection to drainage system by the Planners after the massive implementation of the project on Drainage System on the year 2014 by the Local Government.  The presence of heavy equipments owned by the LGU alleviates the maintenance of Drainage System of the municipality to be functional all the time.

Table 27 – All Units have Adequate Drainage System

3.2.3.6 – Infrastructure/Basic Services Upgrading ( No upgrading on Structures )

There has no units needed for upgrading in relation to Structures. Titay is a 2nd town municipality and this would be the reason that so far the planners has not yet identified any dwelling units for improvements, and another reason may be because   Titay is an agricultural municipality where job seekers usually tend to stay with the relatives or friends in the farm during harvest time or planting season and exit Titay every after the said seasons for their respective residents and back again for the next season.

Table 28 – No Structural Units Need Improvements

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

CHAPTER 7

MONITORING SCHEME AND EVALUATION SCHEME

Table – 45  Monitoring Form 1 

Table – 46 Monitoring Form2

Chapter 8

SANGGUNIANG BAYAN/PANLUNGSOD APPROVAL

ANNEXES

References:

Comprehensive Land Use Plan, Municipality of Titay, Zamboanga Sibugay

Number of Electrical Service Connections by Barangay, ZAMSURECO, Ipil, Z.S.

Quarterly Report 2010, Municipal Treasurer, Titay, Zamboanga Sibugay

Forest Land Used Plan, Municipality of Titay, Zamboanga Sibugay

Republic Act 7279 (Urban Development & Housing Act of 1992)

SWDO-Titay, Zamboanga Sibugay 2010

Inventory of Roads & Bridges, MEO, 2010

MPDC-Titay, Zamboanga Sibugay 2010

NEDA Population Data 2010

NSO Population Data 2007

Local Shelter Plan Formulation Workshop 2015

GLOSSARY

Adaptation

Adaptation is the adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities.

Affordability 

The potential amount of income that could be made available for housing investment after excluding basic necessities such as food, clothing, education, medical expenses, transportation, income tax and recurrent costs of housing (electricity, water, garbage disposal).

Backlog

Backlog is thenumber of dwelling units needed at the beginning of the planning period due to doubled-up HHs, displaced units and homeless HHs/individuals

Displaced units (relocation need)

Units located a) in danger areas such as esteros, railroad tracks, garbage dumps, river banks and flood prone areas or households/individuals living in public places such as sidewalks, roads, parks, play grounds, b) in areas where government infrastructure projects are to be implemented, and c) in areas where there is a court order for eviction and demolition.

Base Year

Base year is the year before the first planning period or the last census year

Capacity

Capacity is combination of all strengths and resources available within a community, society or organization that can reduce the level of risk, or effects of a disaster. Capacity may include infrastructure and physical means, institutions, societal coping abilities, as well as human knowledge, skills and collective attributes such as social relationships, leadership and management. Capacity may also be described as capability.

Climate Change

Climate Change is  a change in climate that can be identified by changes in the mean and/or variability of its properties and that persists for an extended period typically decades or longer, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity.

Disaster

Disaster is a serious disruption of the functioning of a community or a society involving widespread human, material, economic or environmental losses and impacts, which exceeds the ability of the affected community or society to cope using its own resources. Disasters are often described as a result of the combination of: the exposure to a hazard; the conditions of vulnerability that are present; and insufficient capacity or measures to reduce or cope with the potential negative consequences. Disaster impacts may include loss of life, injury, disease and ther negative effects on human, physical, mental and social well-being, together with damage to property, destruction of assets, loss of services, social and economic disruption and environmental degradation.

Disaster Mitigation

Disaster Mitigation is the lessening or limitation of the adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. Mitigation measures encompass engineering techniques and hazard-resistant construction as well as improved environmental policies and public awareness.

Disaster Prevention

Disaster Prevention is the outright avoidance of adverse impacts of hazards and related disasters. It expresses the concept and intention to completely avoid potential adverse impacts through action taken in advance such as construction of dams or embankments that eliminate flood risks, land-use regulations that do not permit any settlement in high-risk zones, and seismic engineering designs that ensure the survival and function of a critical building in any likely earthquake.

Disaster Risk Reduction

Disaster Risk Reduction is the concept and practice of reducing disaster risks through systematic efforts to analyze and manage the causal factors of disasters, including through reduced exposures to hazards, lessened vulnerability of people and property, wise management of land and the environment, and improved preparedness for adverse events.

Doubled-up households

Also known as double occupancy and exists when one dwelling unit is shared by two or more households

Exposure

Exposure is the degree to which the elements at risk are likely to experience hazard events of different magnitudes.

Hazard

Hazard is a dangerous phenomenon, substance, human activity or condition that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihood and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage.

Future Need

Future need refers to the number of new dwelling units needed to supply the demand of new household formed due to population increase.

Homeless

Homeless are the individuals or households living in parks, along sidewalks, and all those without any form of shelter

Household

A household as defined by NSO is a social unit consisting of a person or a group of person who sleep in the same dwelling unit and have common arrangement for the preparation and consumption of food.

Housing Stock

Housing stock is the number of occupied dwelling units at the beginning of the 1st planning period.  It can be computed as the number of households during the beginning of the first planning period minus the number of homeless households and/or individuals, and divide the difference by the number of households per dwelling unit.

Local Shelter Plan

A local shelter plan is a document which includes an analysis of the present local housing situation, i.e., the identification of housing problems, upgrading and future housing needs, household’s affordability and local resources such as land, provision of basic services and finance. After analysis and comparison of the available resources and needs, the LGU formulates the main shelter strategies. An implementation plan will complete the local shelter plan.

Planning Period

Planning period covers the duration that will be needed to realize the housing vision of the LGU.

Program Period

Program period is the time frame set by the LGU to meet the target housing needs due to backlog, population growth and upgrading needs.

Resilience

Resilience is the ability of a system, community or society exposed to hazards to resist, absorb, accommodate and recover from the effects of a hazard in a timely and efficient manner, including through the preservation and restoration of its essential basic structures and functions.

Shelter needs

Shelter needs are 1.) the new housing units needed (lot, basic services and dwelling unit) and 2.) the upgrading needs (either land tenure, some of basic services, or structural improvement of unit or combinations of these).

Shelter strategy

A shelter strategy is a plan of action which defines the objectives for the development of shelter conditions; identifies the resources available to meet the objectives and the means by which they can be used most cost-effectively. It also sets out the responsibilities and time frame for implanting the various measures.

Upgrading Need

Upgrading need is defined as the need for improving land tenure status, e.g., provision of minimum security of tenure as in a written contract to possessing a title to the land; access to basic services, e.g., macadam road to paved road; and house condition, e.g., from a semi-permanent structure to a permanent one.

Vulnerability

Vulnerability is the characteristics and circumstances of a community, system or asset that make it susceptible to the damaging effects of a hazard. Vulnerability may arise from various physical, social, economic, and environmental factors such as poor design and construction of buildings, inadequate protection of assets, lack of public information and awareness, limited official recognition of risks and preparedness measures, and disregard for wise environmental management.

Annex

Annex – 1 to be provided

Annex – 2 Rent Cost/month of 1st Income Group From Year 2016-2025

Annex -3 Rent Cost / month of 2nd Income Group From Year 2016-2025  (1st Option)

Annex – 4 Amortization Cost / month of the 3rd and 4th Income Group (2nd Option)

Annex -5 Amortization Cost / month of the 5th and 6th Income Group (2nd Option)

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

Local Shelter PLan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

CHAPTER 4

4. ASSESSMENT OF AFFORDABILITY 

4.1 Affordability of Households for Housing

This portion of the plan deals with looking into the affordability of the target households to pay for their housing facility.

In determining the affordability for housing of the target households, the planners categorized them into six (6) income groups.  The following assumptions are drawn in assigning the income groupings:

•     The 1st income group is composed mainly of tricycle and small fisher folks, odd jobs/laborers with monthly household income falling below the poverty threshold of P6,690 and below income bracket.  They have a typical household monthly income of P5,000.

•          The 2nd income group has at least two members that have regular income that covers the families of tricycle operators/casual workers, micro scale businessmen and vendors with monthly household income ranging from P6,691 to P15,000.  This group has a typical monthly income of P10,846.

•     The 3rd income group has an average income of P22,501 and has at least two or more members that have permanent incomes that covers the regular employees, small business owners, and skilled-workers with monthly household income ranging from P15,001 to P30,000.

•     The 4th income group comprises the OFW supported families, professionals mainly composed of teachers, nurses, and regular government employees with monthly household income ranging from P30,001 to P45,000 with a usual income of P37,500.

•     The 5th income group includes families of professionals/supervisors/departments heads and OFWs with monthly household income of P45,001 to P60,000 with an average income of P 52,500.

•     The 6th income group consists of highly paid professionals and entrepreneurs with monthly household income of over P60,000 with a typical income of P65,000.

The chart below shows that out of the targeted 3,636 new units needed due to backlog and population growth for the period of 2016 to 2025, approximately 45% or 1,636 units of these belong to the 1st income group, 21.75% or 791 units belong to the 2nd income group, 25.50%  or 927 units for the 3rd income group, 4.85 % (176 units) are in the 4th  income group while 2.10%  (76.35 units) and .80% (29 units) belong to the 5thand 6th income groups, respectively.

Figure _____ Different Income Group by  New Units Needed (%)

Further shows the various potential percentages of the household income that can be used to pay for their housing.  Based on their typical income and percentages of income for housing, the affordable housing loans were computed using the prevailing loan terms (interest rate and number of years to pay) of the government housing programs.

In terms of affordability, the first income group, has an affordable housing of not to exceed P73,785.60.  While the 2nd income group should not exceed P129,198.54,  3rd income group can afford of P254,534.66, the 4th income group can have a maximum loan of P424,220.66, while the 5th income group’s affordable loan is approximately P712,687.99 and lastly, the 6th income group can well afford to pay a loan of around P882,367.

All of the above explanation pertaining to household’s affordability for housing has been summarized in the table below.

Table 29 – Affordability Analysis and Land Need Calculation

The chart below is clearly showing that the 1st  income group has the highest land need of 14.96 hectares and belong to the socialized housing design, followed by 3rd income group having a land need of 10.73 hectares but this group is already belong to economic housing design.

Figure ____ Land Need by Income Group (Ha.)

4.2 – Affordable Housing Options.  This section presents the various affordable housing options for the six income groups.

Based on the estimated costs of land and land development, three (3) affordable housing options were designed.  As shown on the table, the first option is for 1st income group where it was designed for public rental only while the 2nd option is for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th income groups and these units were designed with two schemes “rent and or rent to own a unit” while the 3rd   option is exclusively designed for the 5th and 6th income groups. Single detached option is intended for all the income groups.

There are 1,636 households belong to the first income group that target for provision of new housing units.  The planners have positive outlook after 30 years that these units will be one among of the major local revenue generations of the municipality of Titay.

The Single detached building is the only option so far that the local planners thought best for future need, for thereby accommodating 1,636 units in 14.95 hectares of land.

The cost of land, land development and building construction will be recovered with marginal returns for the LGU.   There is a 12% additional indirect cost on top of land development and building construction cost to defray expenses for documentation, as well as, maintenance of the buildings (See Table 27- Affordable Housing Options).  The household income is also anticipated to increase through the years and enable the target households to cope with the rental.   Basic amenities are present in this scheme including the shared parking facility and a multi-purpose center for community activities.

Option 1 – Each unit will have a 22.5 sq. m floor area having a lot size of 64 sq.m. and with a total land need of 91.43 sq.m. These have been constructed in a location having power and water connection, enclosed bath and toilet, costing P 340,578.40.  These already include all the developmental costs of the building as well as the land development (roads, parking area, green areas and spaces for communal facilities, etc.).

The cost of land, land development and building construction will be recovered with marginal returns for the LGU.   There is a 12% additional indirect cost on top of land development and building construction cost to defray expenses for documentation, as well as, maintenance of the buildings (See Table 27- Affordable Housing Options).  The household income is also anticipated to increase through the years and enable the target households to cope with the rental.   Basic amenities are present in this scheme including the shared parking facility and a multi-purpose center for community activities.

However, with the goal of providing decent and climate change resilient shelters, land only is no longer being promoted as the best option.  The LGU therefore looked for alternative schemes to make shelter affordable to the lowest income group without compromising their safety. So therefore the buildings must be constructed at P10,000/sq.m. to make them beneficial even after 30 years. If after or before 30 years there have some parts of the building needs renovation, the planners are confident that it will cost only less and it will give enough return for the LGU.  Although this is not affordable for this income group but offered for public rental.

Option 2 is having a floor area of 33 sq.m. In an 81 sq.m to be constructed on a 115.71-square meter lot in a location where concrete roads, covered drainage, septic vaults, water and electrical connection are in place. It costs P 481,833.60 per unit.

Option 3 is still a single detached unit having a floor area of 45.5 sq.m., a lot size of 120 sq.m. with a total lot need of 171.43 sq.m., estimated unit cost at P717, 792.00 per  unit.  Develope land includes concrete roads, underground drainage, septic vaults and electrical connection.

Table 30 – Affordable Housing Options

Source: As Computed

Table below shows that out of 6 income groups, only three housing design has been proposed. 1st Income group shows that only P400/month is the amount they can only afford for their housing needs and 450/month as rental is the only key to live a house suitable for a living and that includes the presence of 6 basic infrastructure needs. The P50.00 additional for their monthly rental would not cost them so much compared to the benefit that they get in return. After 30 years, the land, land development and buildings construction costs would be break even in favor to the LGU.

While the 2nd Income group has given the opportunity to rent a house that is more spacious compared with 1st income group. Their capacity to rent is P867.64 but in this design, they are only to rent 800/month with an annual interest rate at 7% for 30 years. In this scheme, the land, land development and building construction can be doubled after 30 years. (See Annex – 3).

While the 3rd and 4th income groups has a scheme to own a unit by a monthly amortization of P2,250 with a 10% interest rate every after 2 years for 25 years (See Annex -4). These 2nd and 3rd income group who has the capacity to amortize and offered with the same housing design with the 2nd income group considering that potential capital cost in housing don’t differed that much so the planners are confident that these households appreciate the low amortization with a very satisfying housing design suitable for them.

The 3rd housing design is just like the 2nd housing design but a bit spacious and offers monthly amortization of P5,000/month with an interest rate of 10% every 2 years. After 30 years, the land, land development and building construction cost will be almost tripled. See Annex – 5.

Table – 31 Affordable Housing Options for Different Income Groups

All income groups will enjoy the basic amenities of concrete main and minor roads, power and water lines, covered drainage and regular garbage collection.  Open spaces provided for parks and play grounds, as well as for other community facilities, can be utilized for day care centers, chapels, multi-purpose center and other community infrastructure desired by the homeowners that are not in conflict with residential use.

In all options, there is a provision for green space for vegetable and urban and ornamental gardening and circulation in support of the “One Village, One Block, One Flower, One Shrub, One Tree” program of the Local government through the Local Housing and Development Office for the relocation sites.

Provision for insurance will be incorporated in all housing options as a beneficial measure in case of fire mishap.

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

 

Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Preface

 This is the formulated Local Shelter Plan for the municipality of Titay. Once adopted by the town, it will serve as the bases of implementation of housing needs of displaced units. When it comes on providing shelter needs of these different types of income group who are consider as displaced households, this formulated local shelter plan of this municipality recommended as a guide or one of the bases of other agencies such as housing developers  and housing contractors to augment with their respective plans, since this plan is likely to be implemented by the LGU in addressing the displaced units pursuant to the Local Government Code 1991 (Republic Act 7160), and the Urban Development and Housing Act of 1992 also known as Republic Act 7279.

This Local Shelter Plan sets forth a recommended course of action which may be readily implemented or halfway implemented by the LGU in minimizing hazards to life and property. While this plan has been recommended, it was understood that the plan is merely advisory in nature. This plan is not intended to replace the scope or range of judgment to be exercised by those agencies/individuals implementing the plan in a given particular circumstances.  Rather, this plan is intend to provide range of recognized guidelines which are uniform and may be implemented in half or in full depending to some circumstances.

In the final analysis, however, the success of any plan remains in the firm description and judgment of the displaced households. With this in mind that the local shelter plan offers the advisory framework within which recommend action that guides the LGU when deciding appropriate response of shelter needs. The town of Titay has displaced households that anytime will be advised for relocation as the way in the case of the occupants occupying municipal roads for widening. Effective shelter plan are dependent upon the coordination and cooperation of all the various public and private agencies that involved on it.

It is wise to presume that every income group has their specific requirements to address their shelter needs and the LGU, implementing agencies and or housing developers must to consider.

Implementing Agency must recognized this shelter plan in the town of  Titay pursuant to the Local Government Code of  1991 (Republic Act 7160) and the urban Development  and housing Act of 1992 also known as Republic Act 7279.

The Local Shelter Plan will be launched on year 2016-2025 as an instrument of humanitarian response to the displaced units in the municipality.  Displaced Households is also considered as one of the  humanitarian crisis that needs to be addressed sooner but not later, and these mostly occurred in urban and or urbanizing areas such as Titay, which is a 2nd class municipality and adjacent to a booming municipality which is Ipil, where people expert to find easier access to opportunities be it of social or economic in nature.

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Foreword

As anyone running a household should know a shelter is among of the basic needs or among the family’s most important needs just like food and clothing.

Titay Local Shelter plan is a plan on how to address displaced units found in the municipality. Facilitating shelter to everyone in a right based in which International Human Rights Law recognized everyone’s right to an adequate standard of living, including adequate housing.

Local Shelter Plan of LGU Titay is the housing plan showing how necessary is to have a shelter plan especially to the displaced Households that are found along national highway of this municipality. This is a plan to be implemented and suits to the municipality and to the displaced households which are the very concern of this plan and why this plan was formulated. Here it shows that the shelter to be provided suited to the different types of income groups and situated in a place where the tenure is secured and with basic needs such as water, access to roads, power, sanitation, and more.  The very concern of this shelter plan is about the displaced units that soon will affect the flow of peace and order of the municipality, and this has been addressed with a ten (10) year plan from the year 2016 to 2025.  This  plan is answering these questions:

How the LGU treat the displaced units found in the municipality?

How the LGU facilitates the displaced households that needs tenure upgrading?

How the LGU provides livable dwelling units for a typical Filipino family purposely for the displaced HHs found in the municipality of Titay only?

Moreover, it shows how the LGU  respond to the challenges facing the country including climate change in relation to low cost housing units specifically to all types of income group that have displaced units along national highway.

Signed:

ROSELLER C. TUMAMOT

MPDC Coordinator, Titay

Zamboanga Sibugay

To proceed click the link below:

Local Shelter Plan – Acknowledgement

Local Shelter Plan – Abstract

Local Shelter Plan – Table of Contents

Local Shelter Plan – List of Acronyms

Local Shelter Plan – Foreword

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Preface

Local Shelter Plan – Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 1

Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 2 – Municipal Overview

Local Shelter Plan –Assessment of Shelter Need, the Chapter 3

Local Shelter Plan – Assessment Affordability, the Chapter 4

Local Shelter Plan –Chapter 5

Local Shelter Plan – WORK AND FINANCIAL PLAN, the Chapter 6

Local Shelter Plan –Local Shelter Plan – Chapter 7 and Chapter 8